Continuing the Crook County News Since 1884

Opinion


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  • Letter to the Editor

    May 2, 2024

    Dear Editor, I am writing in response to Mr. Akola’s recent letters. Over the past few weeks, I like many others, are flabbergasted by Mr. Akola’s ill sought efforts for the county to plow the private road he resided on. I don’t feel that Mr. Akola is accurately representing some of the “facts” he claims. As a resident of Moskee Road, it should be noted that there is more than one family on the six mile stretch of road that the county maintains. Moskee Road is an access point for thousands of acres of public land that all county residents...

  • Letter to the Editor

    Apr 25, 2024

    Dear Editor: Howdy, I’m writing in response to the letters to the editor by Mac Frank and Buck Bock. At first, I thought there was a comprehension issue with poor mister “Mac” talking about cable TV service and such, until I realized there is no Frank Mac or Mac Frank. In any case, the anonymous author deliberately missed the point. Mr. Bock was at least in the ballpark. Buck, I’m going to disagree with, and state that I believe the Crook County Commissioners are not, in some important ways, doing what the folks elected them to do regarding roa...

  • This Side of the Pond

    Sarah Pridgeon|Apr 18, 2024

    Somewhere in the north of England, not too long ago, a good Samaritan stumbled across a creature in need. We’ll never know the identity of our well-meaning citizen because it’s been redacted for the privacy I am sure they will be grateful for now this story has come to light. But we do know all about the good they did that day. Our tale takes place in Cheshire, and I would like to imagine it began in a sunlit glade, deep in the picturesque woods, with spring leaves rustling in the morning breeze...

  • Letter to the Editor

    Apr 11, 2024

    Dear Editor, I returned to Crook County to my grandfather’s place on Rifle Pit Road in 1975. At that time there wasn’t a single light in the night sky visible from my home. I could make out trucks and cars on Interstate 90 during the day, but at night there was almost no traffic. Now, there are clusters of light to my north, east and west and the freeway is a constant stream of vehicles. Surely, I liked it better 49 years ago, but with global population on its way to nine billion, and the worsening effects of the damage eight billion peo...

  • Letters to the Editor

    Apr 4, 2024

    Dear Editor, I read the letter in the March 28 Sundance Times today from Mr. Akola. He’s whining about not getting his road plowed at taxpayer expense. Everyone buying property in Crook County needs to do their homework before buying, just like all other aspects of buying a home. Does the property have water and sewer service, does it have electricity to the property, does it have natural gas, does it have cable, does it have Internet service and, lastly, is the access road to the property plowed by the county? All of these will affect the v...

  • Letter to the Editor

    Mar 28, 2024

    Howdy, I am writing this letter in regards to Crook County Commissioners, who have demonstrated very little knowledge of their duties and responsibilities to the taxpayers of Crook County. I have been asking since day one for the County to maintain and plow a quarter mile of Old Sundance Road. This is for 17 families, to include 33 adults. The Commissioners voted against this request, for the following reasons: 1. They don’t have the funds or resources to do this. 2. If they would do this, it would open a can of worms. 3. Commissioners stated h...

  • This Side of the Pond

    Sarah Pridgeon|Mar 28, 2024

    Never let it be said that my nation fails to give our all when we take on a project. You might even say that we get a bit carried away. Such is the case with the humble honeybee. To be clear, the bees haven’t done anything wrong, unless you count the fact that they keep keeling over. It’s not ideal, but you can hardly blame them. It’s the reaction of the Brits to this news that can be problematic – not because we don’t care, but because we arguably care too much. Since the news came out that...

  • Sommers and Driskill argue against special sesson

    Albert Sommers and Ogden Driskill|Mar 28, 2024

    Last week, in the aftermath of Governor Gordon’s veto of Senate File 54, the Department of Revenue conveyed to us that the veto would effectively halt any additional legislative efforts toward property tax relief in 2024. However, on Monday, the Department of Revenue informed us that property owners could be notified of the exemption in their September tax bills, although it may lead to some confusion for the taxpayer. This information made us take a second look at whether we would recommend a special session. In the end, we think a special s...

  • This Side of the Pond

    Sarah Pridgeon|Mar 21, 2024

    My column this week is a cry for help. I've spent more than a decade trying to make one of my favorite dishes work this far above sea level and I've finally run out of ideas. I've come to know that this community boasts a few world class bakers, so now I'm hoping for a miracle. In exchange for your assistance, I humbly offer a recipe that is widely regarded to be the best thing Britain has ever invented: the Yorkshire pudding. Of course, to use this recipe, you'll need to first be able to tell...

  • Letter to the Editor

    Mar 21, 2024

    Dear Editor, I’ve become frustrated with no help from our county commissioners. A lot of vehicles drive extremely fast by our houses on Barlow Canyon Road. I’ve asked the Commissioners (through Fred Devish) for a solution for quite some time. All I get is a transfer of responsibility to the Sheriff’s Dept or ignored. The speed limit without any further restrictions is 55 m.p.h. We have pets, livestock and our grandchildren that walk or cross this road on a regular basis. Dave Wolfskill...

  • National Ag Week

    Ken Hamilton, Wyoming Farm Bureau Federation Executive Vice President|Mar 21, 2024

    “Growing a Climate for Tomorrow” can mean different things to different people. For farmers and ranchers, it means growing food to feed their families, people in the urban areas as well as those in other countries. Many of the farmers and ranchers growing food are doing so on land that has been in their family for several generations. When you’ve worked the land for decades, you have to learn a lot about your piece of ground. This is particularly true here in Wyoming. Climate and weather conditions can vary a lot from one part of your ranch...

  • Legislature passes conservative budget, largest property tax reform package in state's history

    Albert Sommers and Ogden Driskill|Mar 14, 2024

    On Friday evening, we gaveled a close to the 67th Budget Session in the Wyoming Senate and House. It was a tumultuous budget year. Yet, despite political differences and policy disagreements, the Legislature passed a conservative, balanced budget that addresses our state's needs and invests in the future. Those investments include funding for nursing homes, preschool for developmentally disabled children and home services for senior centers. The budget supports mental health efforts and funds...

  • From the Desk of House Majority Floor Leader Chip Neiman

    Chip Neiman, Representative|Mar 14, 2024

    The gavel has come down on the 67th Budget Session for the final time. So much of what I spent my energy on this legislative session involves safeguarding Wyoming conservative principles. I happily take this fight to the state Capitol because it means better lives for Wyoming families, strengthening our economy and preserving the unique way of life that makes Wyoming so exceptional. Much of that comes down to holding the line on the growth of government and spending. It seems the Legislature is...

  • From the desk of House Majority Floor Leader Chip Neiman

    Chip Neiman, Representative|Mar 7, 2024

    The Wyoming Legislature is heading into the fourth and final week of the Budget Session. The biggest lift is still ahead: reaching a budget agreement between the House and Senate. After both chambers finalized our respective budgets at the end of week two, it became clear that there are big differences between the two bills – both in dollar value and priorities. The House and Senate bills are separated by about $1.1 billion, the largest divide that I have seen during my time in the L...

  • Social Security celebrates Women's History Month

    Josh Weller, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist in Denver, Colorado|Mar 7, 2024

    March is Women’s History Month — a time to focus not just on the past, but also on the challenges women continue to face in the 21st century. At Social Security, we provide vital benefits and financial protection for women. Nearly 55% of people receiving Social Security benefits are women. Today, more women work, pay Social Security taxes and earn credit toward monthly retirement income than at any other time in our nation’s history. Women have longer average life expectancies and tend to live more years in retirement than men. This means women...

  • From the Desk of House Majority Floor Leader Chip Neiman

    Chip Neiman, Representative|Feb 29, 2024

    The Wyoming Legislature marked the halfway point, or "crossover," of the 67th Budget Session this week. On Thursday, February 22, the House completed its third and final reading of the budget bill, House Bill 1. There's still a long way to go. Negotiations and debate now begin to find compromise between the House and Senate. The numbers are still fluid and nowhere near final. What's clear at this point is this: the Legislature is digging too deep into the General Fund. The motto for this budget...

  • From the Desk of Senate President Ogden Driskill

    Ogden Driskill|Feb 29, 2024

    Last week, the Wyoming Legislature marked the halfway point, or “crossover,” of the 67th Budget Session. Both the Senate and House worked late nights to complete final readings of our respective budget bills, which will now head to joint committees for further negotiations. There’s a lot of work to get done, and the hardest is still ahead. Media reported last week that there is a “massive fiscal rift” between the Senate and House budget bills – about a $900 million difference. This owes to a h...

  • Property taxes, electricity rate hikes among Legislatures top priorities

    Ogden Driskill, Senator|Feb 22, 2024

    By Senator Ogden Driskill This week I had the privilege of convening the Wyoming Senate for the start of the Budget Session of the 67th Legislature. Budget sessions occur on even-numbered years, and, as the name suggests, the primary purpose is to approve a balanced budget, as required by the Wyoming Constitution. As the President of the Senate, I am committed to passing a responsible and fiscally conservative budget that invests in our state's needs to today and saves for the needs of...

  • From the desk of House Majority Floor Leader Chip Neiman

    Chip Neiman, Representative|Feb 22, 2024

    As I write this column, the 67th budget session of the Wyoming Legislature is now underway. We are on day five of Wyoming's budget session, which is a shorter, 20-day yearly legislative session primarily focused on prioritizing the state's budget needs. As in the past, I have gone into this session concentrated on controlling and limiting the growth of government. That means closely examining any and all appropriations coming before the House of Representatives – bearing in mind that every d...

  • Letter to the Editor

    Feb 8, 2024

    Dear Editor, Congratulations, Sarah, on receiving multiple top awards from the Wyoming Press Association. You are an asset to the Times and the community! I very much enjoy your column and followed with great interest the saga of the intrepid reporter from the Sundance Times and her trusty Adventure Assistant. Jackie Wyatt, Sundance...

  • This Side of the Pond

    Sarah Pridgeon|Feb 1, 2024

    Half a century after Robert Redford proved he's a real-life outlaw when he grabbed our name and rode right out of town, the real Sundance has finally been represented at the festival he used it for. A brief recap if you missed my last column: I was accidentally invited to the NFP Inspire Lounge at the Sundance Film Festival – the kind of VIP area that's supposed to be for movie stars, producers and celebrity press. I did my best to explain that I wasn't who they thought I was, but it didn't s...

  • Letter to the Editor

    Feb 1, 2024

    Dear Editor, The citizens of Crook County have all had a chance to attend the “meetings” on the proposed zoning of the county. If you are not familiar with the Delphi technique that was used at these meetings, please google and study up on it. The Delphi technique used to “facilitate” the meetings was developed by RAND Corp for the U.S. Department of Defense in the 1950s for use as a psychological weapon. But it was soon recognized to be very valuable in manipulating any meeting toward a pre-determined conclusion. The first clue that you are...

  • Navigating a changing political landscape in Wyoming: A call for voter discernment

    Ogden Driskill and Albert Sommers|Feb 1, 2024

    A new phenomenon is taking root here in Wyoming, where our rural nature and an independent spirit have long defined our political identity. The unmistakable influence of Washington DC-style political messaging has permeated real and virtual spaces, creating a sense of urgency for Wyoming voters to decipher the truth from the lies and half-truths. Now, more than ever, the most crucial task for voters lies in our ability to discern the truth, a skill that hinges on scrutinizing the source. The grassroots integrity of Wyoming’s politics, once b...

  • Property tax and the 2024 legislative session 

    Ogden Driskill and Albert Sommers|Jan 25, 2024

    During and shortly after the Pandemic, much of Wyoming saw significant in-migration of people from other states. This movement of people into Wyoming was a result of our scenic beauty, rural nature, freedoms, and a general sense of restlessness in the nation. The influx of people created a hot real estate market and higher home prices, which resulted in higher residential property taxes, as assessed values skyrocketed in select areas. The increases in assessed value and property taxes, however,...

  • Letter to the Editor

    Jan 18, 2024

    Dear Editor, I just received a letter stating Kenda Huseby NP will be leaving the Crook County Medical Services District clinic in February. Ms. Huseby has given her patients, according to my experience, exceptional care. I am more than disappointed to lose her as my provider. She has always been thorough and made me feel she had a vested interest in my well-being. Others have expressed the same opinion about her to me. Ms. Huseby has strong familial ties to this area and has practiced here for...

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